Scott Galloway is a Genius

Scott Galloway, a professor at NYU's Stern School of Business is one of my new go-to gurus about all things tech.
11.8.17

Guy Stuff: The Body Book for Boys

Some topics are trickier than others to discuss with kids, and broaching the unavoidable topic of puberty tops the list. A time-honored tradition is to purchase a good book on the subject and leave it in the bathroom where it …

8.10.17

Watching Gender from Common Sense

A new report released by Common Sense this week helps parents think about the stereotypes that their kids are exposed when watching television and films.

Many of the ideas are familiar – as adults, we understand the age-old limitations of …

6.22.17

Summer Reading 2017

Time to stuff the book bag – for the plane, for the beach, for the backyard chaise. Here’s what we have loved recently, and can recommend.

Fiction

Exit West by Mohsin Hamid is a short, elegant novel that puts you …

6.7.17

Password Protection

Heard a great seminar recently about protecting your information online. Here is one simple thing that you can do right now to start protecting your data online:
3.30.17

Kids + News Research from Common Sense Media

Common Sense has just released new research on Kids and News. The report is designed for parents, teachers, and policymakers support kids in a 21st-century world, where finding, identifying, evaluating, and using information effectively will be critical.
3.8.17

Book of the Month Club: January 2017

This month, the book we're all talking about is A Gentleman in Moscow. The elegant tale, penned by Amor Towles chronicles four decades in the life of Count Alexander Rostov - an aristocrat who is sentenced to life imprisonment in Moscow's Metropol Hotel by a Bolshevik tribunal in 1922.
1.25.17

Peace Out, First Family

We particularly love that the Obamas valued the arts - and that kids who got to grown up under this presidency are sharing this photo on Facebook today.
1.20.17

Fake News: Why Media Literacy Matters

A recent Stanford University study determined that kids today -- digital natives -- aren't good at distinguishing between what's true and what's being sold to them online. Academics studied kids in middle school, high school, and college and determined that a generation savvy about social media is not necessarily savvy about the reliability of their news and information sources:
1.17.17